Saving photos – Silica Gel

Saving photos – Silica Gel

This is just another quick tip on preserving your precious old photographs, Saving photos – Silica Gel.  It may be an obvious idea now that you have read the opening title but how many of you have thought of doing this? It’s a well proven science that silica gel absorbs moisture and keeps everyday items from having their lives shortened by the dreaded damp. Most houses will suffer damp which will find its way into anything with differing temperatures, the attic for instance.

 

many uses for silica gelAll photos will deteriorate over time, mostly by the silver which starts to degenerate. Not much you can do about this unless you want to spend money on costly preserving techniques that historical archivists use. So plain and simply use silica gel to slow down the inevitable. You can purchase silica gel but why do that when almost everything you buy these days has small sachets thrown in to protect your new product from damp. Collect them and put the little buggers in your biscuit tins, photo boxes and album covers.

 

 

 

There’s a million uses for silica gel which is why you see so many of them. Listed below are some ideas you have probably never considered:

  1. Save your old photos – Old photos usually deteriorate with time, which is really sad because they are the sole reminders of our past and are quite dear to our hearts. Put a couple of silica gel bags in your box of old photos to save them from the dampness that can ruin them.
  2. Put them in your sports bag – Your bags main purpose is to absorb the extra moisture and protect your shoes. Bacteria mostly thrive in damp and moist environments so they can help you eliminate the dampness and germs from your sports bag. They can also eliminate the foul odour.
  3. Make your razors last longer – Don’t leave your razor around in the bath where it’s always wet. Put it in a plastic container with a silica bag inside. It will make it last longer.
  4. Save drowned phone – When your phone drops in water and gets all wet, instead of putting it in a jar of rice try the same with silica bags. Fill a jar with them and put your mobile in, it will be much more effective.
  5. Your makeup bag – Every women needs to have a bag or two of silica gel in her make up purse or bag. It will stop the powdery make up from curdling.
  6. Front windscreen – This one is brilliant. Instead of waiting for the air conditioning to do its job, which in older car models can take forever, put a bunch of these silica gel bags under your windshield from the inside immediately. You’ll see that tomorrow your windows won’t be foggy. It’s the fastest way to stop your windows from fogging up and you’ll save yourself the 10 extra minutes needed to clean them up.

Royton Urban District Council

Royton Urban District Council.

The photo below depicts Royton Urban District Council showing off their service vehicles in front of Royton baths. It was quite a common thing to do up until around the 60’s when sadly it seemed to stop globally. I say sadly because in the future it will be more difficult for people to research their own areas and will not be able to identify with their town or village.
I live in this area and love restoring old photos linked to Royton, but the pressure of doing photos for other people restricts the time I have for some self indulgency.
I’m going to set a page up on this website for any old pictures I come across of the my hometown though it may take some time to fill it up due to my work load.

There was quite a lot of work to do on this photo of Royton Urban District Council. Mostly because of colourising it in addition to restoring it. In total there was 21 layers needed to complete the photo, a large part being the colour layers but many more layers were used whilst performing the repair.
I have a new technique for replacing backgrounds for instance adding a new skyline. So this will feature much more in pictures restored in the future. It’s kind of a trademark with me and anything that helps speed up the process is very welcome.

A gentleman from a local site offered this information. “First looks like a Bedford the second from the left looks like an old Dennis ex Desert Campaign four wheel drive. And the last two purpose built refuse bodies which could be on any make of chassis The chimneys are from the left Bath Mill, Fir Mill just over the Baths roof and the Baths when it was heated by coal fired boiler. Your colour choice is not far out from memory amazing update PR”

Royton Urban District Council 1863 to 1974

This is the original photo with the usual creases, blemishes. low contrast and everything else you get with an old picture.

magaret sutcliffe-Royton Council

Brief history of Royton.

Royton council dates from 1863 to 1974, a local government district in Lancashire which covered the modern-day town of Royton and its suburbs and districts.
Royton covers a significant area to the north-west of the Oldham and formed part of the Oldham Parliamentary  constituency until abolished in 1950.

The township of Royton historically lay in the large parish of Prestwich cum Oldham. In 1863 Royton Local Government District was created when the township adopted the local Government act of 1858. A local board was formed to govern the town and in 1879 the district was enlarged by the addition of parts of Thornham township. The Local Government act of 1894 then reconstituted the area as an Urban District thus Royton Urban District Council replaced the local board. The urban district was divided into five wards: Dogford, Dryclough, Haggate, Heyside, and Thornham, with each ward returning three councillors to the fifteen-member council. The only change to boundaries was in 1933, when the Lancashire Review Order added a small area from the neighbouring borough of Middleton.

In 1974 Royton Urban District was abolished by the Local Government act of 1972 and its former area transferred to Gtr Manchester to form part of the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham. This is how it stands today, 2014, though many people still regret the loss of being part of Lancashire and stoically address their mail as Lancs and not Gtr Manchester.